• Research shows that when we eat in groups, we tend to order similar types of food. Food economists also found that diners who caved to this subtle peer pressure also tended to be happier with their choice. Looking for dinner dates? Round out your guest list with friends more likely to get a side of veggies than fries.
  • Research shows that patrons at high-top tables tended to order more fish and fewer desserts, and diners near the window were 80 percent more likely to have salads. Maybe a high table makes you feel more in control, and sitting near a window feels more public, the why isn't clear.
  • Sitting far from the bar can save you tons of calories. When you're in view of the television, you're distracted and tend to consume more. And research shows you are more likely to order more drinks when surrounded by people who are drinking.
  • One study on buffet patrons shows that what we choose first dictates how healthy the rest of our choices are. At dinner? Head to the salad station first.
  • We tend to underestimate how much liquid is in short tumblers—which is why bartenders typically pour 27 percent more alcohol into short glasses than tall ones. So when sipping from a tall glass, you'll have fewer calories without feeling deprived.